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5th Tony Kent Strix Annual Memorial Lecture 2019
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5th Tony Kent Strix Annual Memorial Lecture 2019

 Export to Your Calendar 29/11/2019
When: Friday 29 November 2019
From 1:30 PM until 5:00 PM
Where: Map this event »
The Geological Society
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London W1J 0BD
United Kingdom
Presenter: Professor Pia Borland
Contact: Gary Horrocks


Online registration is available until: 22/11/2019
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UkeiG

5th Tony Kent Strix Annual Memorial Lecture 2019 

Friday, 29 November 2019 - 1:30pm to 5:00pm 

The 5th Tony Kent Strix Annual Memorial Lecture 2019 will be delivered by Professor Pia Borlund (Department of Archivistics, Library and Information Science at Oslo Metropolitan University), and will take place on the afternoon of Friday, 29 November 2019 at The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London.

Last year UKeiG, in partnership with the International Society for Knowledge Organisation UK (ISKO UK), the Royal Society of Chemistry Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (RSC CICAG) and the British Computer Society Information Retrieval Specialist Group (BCS IRSG) was delighted to announce that the winner of the prestigious Tony Kent Strix Award for 2018 was Professor Pia Borlund’s (Department of Archivistics, Library and Information Science at Oslo Metropolitan University)..

Programme and topics

  • 1.30 Registration
  • 2.00 Douglas Veal - Chairman's welcome
  • 2.10 Introductory presentation – Dr Andrew Macfarlane

    Sender vs Recipient Orientated Information Systems Revisited

    Abstract: Belkin and Robertson in 1976 reflected on the ethical implications of theoretical research in information science and warned that there was potential for abuse of knowledge gained by undertaking such research. In particular, they identified the domains of advertising and politics that posed particular problems. Recent events in global information systems have demonstrated that their fears were justified. Information science theories have been used in conjunction with empirical evidence gathered from user interactions that have been detrimental to both individuals and society. It is argued in the paper that the IR community should find ways to return control to the user where at all possible, and ways to achieve this are considered. Specifically, we argue that information systems such as search technologies should be designed with the recipient of information in mind, not the sender of that information.
  • 2.45 Questions & Discussion
  • 3.00 Tea & coffee
  • 3.45 The Tony Kent Strix Annual Memorial Lecture

Abstract: My Tony Kent Strix Memorial Award 2018 acceptance talk introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR), which is concerned with how people search for digital information. More specifically, the presentation addresses methodological issues of IIR evaluation in terms of what it entails to study users' use and interaction with IR systems, as well as their satisfaction with retrieved information, by presenting the IIR evaluation model. Central to this model is the employment of simulated work task situations as assigned search tasks, which has become a standard way of testing users’ interaction and satisfaction in IR. Though this approach of assigned search tasks appears simple and easy to employ it is in fact challenging, and wrong use may have implications for evaluation results, therefore strengths and weaknesses will be discussed. 

  • 4.30 Questions & discussion
  • 5.00 Meeting closes

Related knowledge and skills (See PSKB categories)  

Speakers

Professor Pia Borlund (Department of Archivistics, Library and Information Science at Oslo Metropolitan University). Professor Pia Borlund's Biography can be found here.

Abstract: My Tony Kent Strix Memorial Award 2018 acceptance talk introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR), which is concerned with how people search for digital information. More specifically, the presentation addresses methodological issues of IIR evaluation in terms of what it entails to study users' use and interaction with IR systems, as well as their satisfaction with retrieved information, by presenting the IIR evaluation model. Central to this model is the employment of simulated work task situations as assigned search tasks, which has become a standard way of testing users’ interaction and satisfaction in IR. Though this approach of assigned search tasks appears simple and easy to employ it is in fact challenging, and wrong use may have implications for evaluation results, therefore strengths and weaknesses will be discussed.

Dr. Andrew MacFarland  (Reader in Information Retrieval, City University, London).

He is a Reader in Information Retrieval and is a member of the Centre for HCI Design at City, University of London. He got his PhD in Information Science under the supervision of Prof Robertson and Prof J.A. McCann (Imperial College London).

His research interests currently focus on a number of areas including disabilities and Information Retrieval (dyslexia in particular), AI techniques for Information Retrieval and Filtering, and Image Retrieval.

He is a member of the BCS Information Retrieval Specialist Group and is a long standing member of that SG as well as a past chair. He was the principle investigator for a project funded by the TSB entitled "PhotoBrief" and is was also a co-investigator for the SocialSensor project.

 

 

 

Ticket Information

This is a free event, open to everyone but advance bookings are required.

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