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People, Place and Peru - How far do you go to taste a guinea pig - by Chloe Daykin

Posted By Jacob Hope, 01 August 2019
Updated: 01 August 2019
We are delighted to welcome author Chloe Daykin who talks here about her new novel, 'Fire Girl Forest Boy' and launches an exciting competition for National Libraries week supported by Faber Children's Books.

I’ve been lucky enough to go on a couple of amazing trips for writing research. The first was thanks to the inaugural Julia Darling travel fellowship (after the much loved and missed wonderful person and author/poet/playwright Julia Darling). On that trip I travelled up to the arctic circle and beyond, to the Lofoten Islands on a sleeper train, staying in log cabins, swimming in fjords and eating cinnamon buns and salmon and hot potato cakes and seeing what emerged into my second book The Boy Who Hit Play.

Last year I was lucky enough to be awarded an arts council grant to travel to Peru to research my third, Fire Girl Forest Boy.  I travelled to shiny white volcanic towns, high altitude lakes, canyons, in rickshaws, buses (so many buses), reed canoes, up through the forest mists to Machu Picchu, the water filled streets of Ollaytaytambo stayed in houses with hot water bottles made from old Inca Cola cartons, soaked in hot springs and drank herbal altitude remedies up high, so high your lungs shrink so small you feel like you’re walking on the moon. 

A key thing to me when writing set in different places is people. As much as I like seeing landscapes and places it’s really people for me that matter and it’s them, their food, their culture and honest way of being that I need to soak up. It feels important to be genuine. And personalities for me need to come from a really real place. So, as much I loved it all it was really the people I went for. The people and the food!

I ate rice pudding from carts, hot dripping charcoal roast chicken with sweet purple chicca morada, alpaca, a little bit of guinea pig, alfadores (cookies sandwiched with caramel), passionfruit three milk cake with thick whipped white icing and red tea, and quinoa. Loads of quinoa. My favourite was quinoa porridge from a family up in the mountains. Delicious! 

On coming home and getting on with the writing it’s hard to know what’s going to make it in or out. 
What I hope that’s made it through into the book is the people’s soulfulness. Their honesty. Integrity. Openness and kindness.  I love their belief in magic. And if you belief in something enough you see it around you. I hope I’ve been able to capture some of that.

As a kid I thought the most exciting place to explore was the jungle. Flying over the amazon while eating my inflight dinner is something I’ll never forget.  So I hope that’s in there too.  A love of the jungle, told at a pace that feels like running through it..  A wild environmental journey through the cloud forests, lawless towns, crisp cities and up into the otherworldly Lima Cathedral - with its art of decapitated martyrs, monsters exploding out of bellies and guinea pig last supper! 

Some of the landscapes are remembered. Some imagined. The environmental aspect came later from home based research. I guess if you love a place you want to protect it. So raising awareness of the illegal logging that’s going on (largely un-reported) - that’s effecting Peru so badly right now felt really important. 

Just after finishing the novel I read of a man was burned alive in Iquitos (where a chunk of the book is set) for standing up for indigenous communities, against mining and logging. His braveness and courage is humbling. I hope this books brings awareness of this cause in whatever small way it can. Without people standing up for each other we’re sunk.  And the people of Peru need standing up for and alongside.

I hope you enjoy the book. When I was writing it I was thinking a lot about Journey to The River Sea, Trash, Matilda, Rooftoppers, Keeper and One Hundred Years of Solitude. So perhaps some of that may have seeped in too.  
 
This week we have the incredibly lovely news that Fire Girl Forest Boy has been long listed for the Guardian’s Not The Booker prize.  And I am very proud and honoured! If you fancy a look at the list - for there are many many wonderful books on it - or a vote the link is here.
 
Before I was an author I started out as an artists/designer//bookbinder and to celebrate the brilliant National Libraries Week (organised by CILIP, the library and information association), in October we’re running a prize of having a library window painted in a lush tropical jungly style (by me!).  Simply tweet a pic of your library window with the hashtag #firegirlforestboy #librariesweek to be in with a chance to win. I would love to meet you and make your library look even lovelier!  Till then, happy reading and a massive thanks for all the hard and wonderful work you do!!!

 

Tags:  National Libraries Week  Reading  Reading Development  reading for pleasure  travel 

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